Google adds Sinhala and Tamil to speech recognition option

Google today announced that it has added Sinhala and Tamil to its speech recognition option.

Using voice to dictate a message can be up to three times faster than typing. With this in mind, Google said it was bringing voice typing (aka talking to your phone instead of typing) to 30 languages and locales around the world, covering more than a billion people.

With the update, Google’s speech recognition supports 119 language varieties, in Gboard on Android, Voice Search and more. And now in the U.S. in English, you can use use voice dictation to express yourself with emoji.

To honor languages around the world, speech recognition will support ancient languages such as Georgian, which has an alphabet that dates back to the 10th century. Google is also adding Swahili and Amharic, two of Africa’s largest languages, as well as many Indian languages on our quest to make the internet more inclusive.

The newly supported languages are Amharic (Ethiopia), Armenian (Armenia), Azerbaijani (Azerbaijani), Bengali (Bangladesh, India), English (Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania), Georgian (Georgia), Gujarati (India), Javanese (Indonesia), Kannada (India), Khmer (Cambodian), Lao (Laos), Latvian (Latvia), Malayalam (India), Marathi (India), Nepali (Nepal), Sinhala (Sri Lanka), Sundanese (Indonesia), Swahili (Tanzania, Kenya), Tamil (India, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Malaysia), Telugu (India), Urdu (Pakistan, India).

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