Case against Shavendra dismissed

The District Court for the Southern District of New York has dismissed a lawsuit filed by Tamil victims of the armed conflict in Sri Lanka against Shavendra Silva, a former Sri Lanka Army general, who is now Sri Lanka’s Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York, a statement released in Washington today said.

Tamil plaintiffs in the case turned to a U.S. court to obtain redress and establish the truth about the deaths of their relatives, a human rights group said in the statement.

The right group known as SPEAK has accused the Sri Lankan government of refusing to acknowledge its responsibility for any violations of international law, even in the face of the United Nations’ conclusion that its wartime conduct “represented a grave assault on the entire regime of international law.”

Although acknowledging “the gravity of the allegations made by the plaintiffs,” Judge J. Paul Oetken concluded that Silva’s diplomatic immunity precluded the court from looking at the merits of the plaintiffs’ claims.

“We hope that the Court reconsiders, rectifies its position and enforces ‘jus cogens’ principles,” said Sivakumaren Mardemootoo, co-director of SPEAK Human Rights & Environmental Initiative.

“Interpreting the law to provide a diplomatic ‘cloak’ of protection to Silva—who is seen as a war hero in Sri Lanka, but as a war criminal by the United Nations Panel of Experts—contravenes the U.S. Congress’s intent behind the law,” said Ali Beydoun, co-director at SPEAK and director of the UNROW Human Rights Impact Litigation Clinic.

Nasheed’s family in Sri Lanka

The family of former Maldivian President Mohammad Nasheed arrived in Sri Lanka last night and sought refuge following the unrest in the Maldives.

Sources at the President’s office told The Hub that Nasheed’s wife Laila Ali had spoken to President Mahinda Rajapaksa over the telephone after arriving in the country.

President Rajapaksa had then telephoned the newly appointed Maldivian President Mohammed Waheed Hassan and urged him to ensure the safety of Nasheed who was arrested after he staged a protest in the Maldivian capital Male yesterday.

President Waheed has then assured President Rajapaksa that no harm will come to Nasheed, the President’s office said.

President Rajapaksa had also telephoned Nasheed to inquire about his safety, the President’s office added.

Nasheed was injured on Tuesday and briefly hospitalised after he was beaten by police during a rally of his supporters in the capital.

Sri Lanka had called for a peaceful end to the issue in the Maldives after protests led to the resignation of former Nasheed.

Nasheed had claimed that he was forced to resign under duress and wants an election at which he will contest for the Presidency again.

The Sri Lankan External Affairs Ministry had said in a statement on Wednesday that the developments are internal matters of the Maldives and hopes that all issues pertaining to this transition be resolved in a peaceful manner.

“As the closest neighbor, Sri Lanka enjoys a cordial relationship with the government and people of the Maldives, and wishes to assure its fullest support and co-operation to the Government of the Maldives in its efforts to bring peace and stability to the country and prosperity to the Maldivian people,” the External Affairs Ministry had said.

Nasheed was forced to relinquish power on Tuesday following days of protests over his decision to sack the criminal court judge Abdullah Mohamed.

 

(Report by Easwaran Rutnam)

 

Canadian Tamil pleads guilty in LTTE case

At the University of Waterloo, Ramanan Mylvaganam was vice-president of the Tamil Students Association. He earned two graduate degrees and won a coveted work placement at Microsoft Corp.

But in a Brooklyn, N.Y., courtroom on Wednesday, the 35-year-old Canadian computer engineer pleaded guilty to terrorist conspiracy for his role in a plot to supply Sri Lanka’s Tamil Tigers rebels.

One of six Toronto-area men arrested in 2006 for allegedly providing weapons and equipment to the rebels, also known as the LTTE, he faces up to 15 years imprisonment when he returns to court May 4 for sentencing.

“The defendant conspired to provide sophisticated technological equipment to the LTTE, a foreign terrorist organization that has carried out brutal acts of violence against numerous civilians and elected officials,” U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch said in a statement Wednesday.

The arrests of Mylvaganam and his alleged co-conspirator, Suresh Sriskandarajah, who was president of the University of Waterloo Tamil Students Association, raised concerns about possible abuse by campus groups.

Related
Exclusive: ‘Waterloo Suresh’ fights for a bright future, free from charges of supporting terrorism
An audit of the Tamil student group found no financial irregularities but a review of the university’s work placement program recommended closer monitoring by campus and diplomatic officials of students who conduct their co-ops abroad.

Mr. Sriskandarajah, also known as Waterloo Suresh, had allegedly begun working for the rebels during a co-op placement in Sri Lanka, and Mylvaganam had told a British Columbia company he needed night vision goggles for a fourth year design project at the university.

In announcing the plea, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said the LTTE had carried out roughly 200 suicide bombings and “numerous political assassinations,” including those of Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of India and the Sri Lankan President Ranasinghe Premadasa.

But the rebels were revered by a segment of Canada’s ethnic Tamil community, one of the world’s largest, which financially supported the LTTE during its three-decade fight for an independent state for Sri Lanka’s minority Tamils.

The Tigers raised millions in Canada during the conflict, prompting the RCMP to close the main front organization in Toronto, the World Tamil Movement, after an investigation found it was effectively an arm of the rebels.

The Sri Lankan civil war ended in 2009 when the rebels were crushed by government forces, but the cases of Canadians accused of providing support to the armed group continue to make their way through the courts.

The Ontario courts have ordered Mr. Sriskandarajah and Pratheepan Nadarajah, who is accused of trying to buy $1-million worth of missiles and AK-47s, to stand trial in the U.S. but both have appealed their extraditions to the Supreme Court of Canada.

Five others, three of them Canadians, have already pleaded guilty to buying arms for the rebels in a related case. One is a former national president of the Tamil Students Association. Last fall, the three Canadians, who are serving life sentences, signed an open letter from prison acknowledging they were wrong and renouncing political violence.

Mylvaganam’s guilty plea could complicate Mr. Sriskandarajah’s case, since the two are alleged to have conspired together to acquire submarine design software, night vision goggles, computer equipment, electronic components and communications gear.

Born in Sri Lanka, Mylvaganam, who lived in Mississauga, Ont., pleaded guilty to a single count of conspiracy to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization. He was tried in the United States because the offences occurred partly while he was working in Washington state.

His family declined to comment.

“We will use all resources at our disposal to bring terrorist organizations and their supporters to justice,” Ms. Lynch said. Added Janice Fedarcyk, FBI Assistant Director-in-Charge, “Material support here for foreign terrorist organizations can have lethal consequences.”

Prior to his extradition, Mylvaganam wrote an open letter asking for donations to pay his legal bills. He said he was already $150,000 in debt and had sold his house. “Without your help, I cannot effectively defend myself in the U.S. courts,” he wrote.

A CIBC account was opened to collect donations and a Justice for Ramanan page went up on Facebook. “Rest assured that when I am freed, I would be a valuable asset to this very community that has proven to be a safe haven for me and my family,” it quoted him as saying. (National Post)

Lanka releases new video on LTTE

Sri Lanka released a new video on Wednesday which looks at the various crimes committed by the Tamil Tiger rebels during a brutal 30 year war.

The release of the video comes as Sri Lanka prepares to face pressure at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva later this month to probe allegations committed by the military during the war.

The Sri Lankan Media Center for National Security said that the video titled “Ruthless” recounts true accounts of survivors who once, had lived under the brutal and repressive regime of the Tamil Tigers but were now willing to speak freely on what they had experienced during the days of the war.

“It is well known to the world that many calculated efforts are being taken by various groups to whitewash the Tamil Tigers and its atrocities and accuse the government of Sri Lanka for allegedly committing war crimes instead.  The video was released amidst such allegations to show the world what really had happened during the time of war,” the Director of the Media Center for National Security Lakshman Hullugale said.

The video has been produced by Sri Lanka’s Ministry of Defence and Urban Development headed by Gotabhaya Rajapaksa, a brother of President Mahinda Rajapaksa.

The Defence Ministry had last year released a video to counter the allegations raised against the Sri Lankan military in a series of documentaries by a British television Channel.

The documentaries by the British television had alleged that the Sri Lankan military had committed serious war crimes during the final battle against the rebels before the rebels were defeated in 2009.

A US War Crimes official is currently in Sri Lanka meeting with the government to discuss some of the allegations while two other top US government officials are also due in Sri Lanka next week.

Stephen J Rapp, Ambassador at Large for the Office of Global Criminal Justice of the US State Department met Sri Lanka’s External Affairs Minister G.L. Peiris and discussed some of the concerns, the Sri Lankan External Affairs Ministry said on Wednesday.

Lanka wants peaceful end to Maldives issue

Sri Lanka has called for a peaceful end to the issue in the Maldives after protests led to the resignation of former President Mohamed Nasheed.

The Sri Lankan External Affairs Ministry said in a statement on Wednesday that the developments are internal matters of the Maldives and hopes that all issues pertaining to this transition be resolved in a peaceful manner.

Sri Lanka also said that it had noted the resignation of the President of the Maldives Mohamed Nasheed and the swearing in of its Vice-President, Dr. Mohamed Waheed as the President of the Maldives.

“As the closest neighbor, Sri Lanka enjoys a cordial relationship with the government and people of the Maldives, and wishes to assure its fullest support and co-operation to the Government of the Maldives in its efforts to bring peace and stability to the country and prosperity to the Maldivian people,” the External Affairs Ministry said.

The New Maldives President called for calm after he took office on Tuesday and also promised to take the country forward.

Nasheed was forced to relinquish power on Tuesday following days of protests over his decision to sack the criminal court judge Abdullah Mohamed.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon voiced hope on Tuesday that the resignation of the President of the Maldives and the appointment of his deputy as the new leader will help to peacefully end the ongoing political crisis in the Indian Ocean country.

Ban called on all Maldivians to “refrain from violence and engage constructively” in tackling the challenges facing the country, adding that he hoped the Maldives will be able to build on “the important gains” it has recently made in establishing democracy and the rule of law.

Later this week Assistant Secretary-General Oscar Fernandez-Taranco will lead a United Nations political mission to the Maldives to help the country deal with its recent tensions.

Hundreds turn up for demo

Hundreds of people turned up for the demonstration held near the Hulftsdorp complex in support of Sarath Fonseka.

UNP leader Ranil Wickremesinghe and deputy leader Sajith Premadasa were among those who attended the protest organized by the Democratic National Alliance (DNA).

Sarath Fonseka was escorted to the court under tight police protection at the time the demonstration was underway.

Earlier a Magistrate had issued an order preventing the protestors from disrupting traffic or inciting violence during the demonstration.

Court order on Fonseka protest

The Kesselwatte police have obtained a Court order against the protest to be held today in Aluthkade in support of Sarath Fonseka.

According to the police, the Magistrate ordered the police last night to ensure that the protestors do not obstruct traffic or incite violence during the protest this morning.

Incidentally the police had recovered several hand grenades in Aluthkade yesterday.

TNA and Rapp hold talks

Ahead of a key UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) session where the US may move an anti-Sri Lanka resolution, leaders of the main Tamil party on Tuesday met visiting US diplomat Stephen Rapp and discussed matters relating to the minority community.

Tamil National Alliance (TNA) leader R Sampanthan and the party’s national list MP M A Sumanthiran held talks with Rapp, the US Ambassador at Large on Global Criminal Justice who is on a 4-day visit to the island nation.

Several matters related to the problems faced by the minority Tamils were discussed at the meeting, a TNA release said.

Rapp’s visit assumes significance against the backdrop of accusations by Colombo that the US was trying to coax governments to support its possible anti-Sri Lanka resolution at the UNHRC session in Geneva later this month..

The proposed resolution is likely to be based on a letter sent to Sri Lankan External Affairs Minister G L Peiris by US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on January 27 emphasising the need for implementing recommendations of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC).

Two more US officials who would be visiting Colombo over the weekend are Under Secretary for Civilian Security Democracy and Human Rights Marie Otero and Assistant Secretary for Central and South Asian Affairs Robert Blake. (PTI)

Indians accuse Sri Lankan Navy

Indian fishermen in more than 600 fishing boats returned without fishing at Rameswaram after Sri Lankan Naval personnel allegedly pelted stones and bottles to prevent them from crossing the International Maritime Boundary Line near Katchatheevu, Indian fisheries department officials said on Tuesday.

Stones and glass pieces were found strewn in more than 30 boats, and fishermen in more than 600 boats had to return on Monday night without fishing, they said. Katchatheevu is an islet ceded to Sri Lanka by India in 1974.

The fishermen said they could not get any fish in the Indian waters. (Agencies)

Four Lankans jailed in UK

Four Sri Lankan men have been jailed in the UK for their part in a conspiracy to supply fraudulent identity documents, the British High Commission said in a statement today.

The last of the four men was sentenced to 13 months’ imprisonment on 3 February after he pleaded guilty to a charge of conspiracy to facilitate a breach of the UK’s immigration laws.

The men had sourced fake passports and residence permits with the intention of using them to illegally secure employment in the UK. At earlier court hearings, two of the men were jailed for 12 months and one was jailed for six months.

The fraud was first detected when UK Border Agency officers based at Heathrow Airport intercepted a parcel containing fake passports and resident permits addressed to one of the men. Officers visited the property and found other fraudulent documents. The four men were arrested at two addresses in Watford and Harrow.

“One of the men was supplying fake documents to help others stay in the UK illegally and secure work to which they were not entitled. These offenders had only one intention, to take employment opportunities away from genuine jobseekers – clearly, a serious offence,” a UK Border Agency spokesperson said.

Three of the men had overstayed their UK visas. The fourth man had a valid student visa at the time of his arrest, which was subsequently revoked. The UK Border Agency will work to remove them from the UK at the end of their sentences.

The operation involved police officers and UK Border Agency officers working together to investigate organised immigration crime.

Businesses that employ workers who do not have permission to work face fines of up to £10,000 for each illegal worker, unless they can prove that they carried out the correct pre-employment checks.

Maldives President resigns

Maldives President Mohamed Nasheed resigned on Tuesday following overnight protests and demonstrations, the Maldives High Commission in Colombo said.

A spokesman at the High Commission said that the Vice President of the country, Dr. Mohommad Wahid, was now the acting President.

A spokesman for the Maldives opposition Dhivehi Qaumee Party (DQP) told The Hub earlier that a majority of the police and army were also backing the removal of Nasheed from power.

DQP spokesman Mohhomad Malech Jamal said that there were now celebrations in Male following the announcement that Nasheed had resigned.

Violence broke out on Monday night as the army and police were deployed to break up protestors gathered at Republic Square.

Jamal claimed that a majority of the policemen later supported the protest seeking the removal of Nasheed and this led to a confrontation between the army and police.

“About 800 Police officers gathered at the Republic Square. Several of them are calling for the resignation of President Nasheed. Two Police Officers are issuing commands to these officers separately,” Jamal said.

The country’s Supreme Court was to rule on Tuesday on the legitimacy of Nasheed’s Presidency as pressure mounted for him to step down

The protests began after the President ordered the arrest of a top criminal court judge over allegations of corruption.

Maldives is a top tourist destination in the world made up of several islands.

 

(Report by Easwaran Rutnam)

Maldives islands tensed

Maldives was tensed on Tuesday amidst opposition moves to remove President Mohamed Nasheed from power.

A spokesman for the Maldives opposition Dhivehi Qaumee Party (DQP) told The Hub that the Maldives Vice President Dr. Mohommad Wahid was now running the country following overnight violence,

DQP spokesman Mohamed Maleeh Jamal said that a majority of the police and army were also backing the removal of Nasheed from power.

He said that the Male international airport and the State broadcaster were also under the control of the police and army.

Violence broke out on Monday night as the army and police were deployed to break up protestors gathered at Republic Square.

Jamal claimed that a majority of the policemen later supported the protest seeking the removal of Nasheed and this led to a confrontation between the army and police.

“About 800 Police officers gathered at the Republic Square. Several of them are calling for the resignation of President Nasheed. Two Police Officers are issuing commands to these officers separately,” Jamal said.

The country’s Supreme Court was to rule on Tuesday on the legitimacy of Nasheed’s Presidency as pressure mounted for him to step down

The protests began after the President ordered the arrest of a top criminal court judge over allegations of corruption.

The protests began after the President ordered the arrest of a top criminal court judge over allegations of corruption.

Maldives is a top tourist destination in the world made up of several islands.

 

(Report by Easwaran Rutnam)

Bomb found at Aluthkade

A Bomb has been found near the Aluthkade Courts complex, police spokesman Ajith Rohana told The Hub a short while ago.

He said that the bomb disposal squad has been sent to the location.

UPDATE: The police spokesman later said that several hand grenades were found at the location.

Americans injured in Puttalam accident

Three American nationals were injured when the vehicle they were travelling in fell off a bridge in Puttalam today.

According to the police, the Americans were heading to Mannar after visiting the Norocholai coal power plant when the accident occurred.

The vehicle they were travelling in had veered off the road and fallen off the bridge and into a river injuring all three of them.

The police said that the Americans were admitted to hospital for treatment.

The vehicle had sunk some 10 feet in the river and attempts are being made to lift the vehicle out.

Investigations into the accident are underway.

US confirms Blakes visit

The US State department has confirmed that US Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs Robert O. Blake, Jr. will travel to Sri Lanka next week.

Earlier the US Embassy in Colombo and the External Affairs remained tight lipped over his visit to Colombo despite details being leaked to the media.

However in a press statement on Monday the State Department confirmed that Blake will visit Sri Lanka between February 12-14.

Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights Maria Otero will also be in Sri Lanka during that period, the State Department said.

In Sri Lanka, Under Secretary Otero and Assistant Secretary Blake will meet with a broad spectrum of Sri Lankan government officials and attend a luncheon hosted by Minister of External Affairs G.L. Peiris. Under Secretary Otero and Assistant Secretary Blake will also meet with civil society representatives, youth groups, and political leaders.

Following her visit to Sri Lanka, Under Secretary Otero will travel to New Delhi, India February 14-15 to meet with senior government officials, civil society representatives and youth leaders.

Assistant Secretary Blake will depart Colombo for Bangladesh, where he will stay from February 14-16 and participate in a series of education and university events.

Sri Lanka seeks release of abducted fishermen

Sri Lanka has sought assistance to secure the release of six fishermen held captive by Somali pirates.

The government information department said that the Sri Lankan authorities are negotiating with the pirates through an intermediary.

The pirates have demanded US$ 6 million for the release of the fishermen after they were taken captive by the pirates in the Indian Ocean last year.

The pirates have contacted the family members of the abducted fishermen and demanded the ransom and also assured that the fishermen are in good health.

“After talking to the leader of the pirates Captain Ali and another pirate named Mohamed Hussain, they have said there is a possibility of getting the ransom amount reduced,” the government said.

Minister of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Development Dr. Rajitha Senaratne said every attempt will be made to secure the release of the fishermen and their vessel.

The External Affairs Ministry said that the Sri Lankan embassies in Kenya and Egypt have been advised on the measures that need to be taken to secure the release of the six fishermen.

Blake sees promise in LLRC

US Assistant Secretary of State Robert Blake says Sri Lanka’s Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission had laid the groundwork for continued reconciliation following Sri Lanka’s 26-year-long conflict with the LTTE.

“The LLRC offers a very promising way forward to help Sri Lanka become again the Island of peace and prosperity,” Blake said. “The U.S. will support reaching those goals.”

He said this at Sri Lanka’s Independence Day celebrations held in the US on Saturday, the Sri Lankan Embassy in the US said in a statement today.

Meanwhile Sri Lanka’s Ambassador to the US Jaliya Wickramasuriya recognized the strong relations between the U.S. and Sri Lanka, as well as the positive results of the re-development policies of His Excellency President Mahinda Rajapaksa for Sri Lanka.

“Sri Lankans know that the best solutions will be home-grown,” the ambassador said at the event. “We know our country, we know our people and we know the expectations of our people. We know what works, and, because we are a democracy, we know that the solutions we seek will be adopted by a representative government.

“That is, after all, how the great democracies of the world have settled their internal issues, including the United States. As we look to the United States as an example of self-determination, I am happy to report that our relationship with the U.S. remains strong and is growing stronger.”

The ambassador called upon Sri Lankan-Americans to “tell the correct story of Sri Lanka’s progress,” and on Sri Lankan youth to “remember your roots.”

 

Gota says north not militarized

Sri Lankan defence secretary Gotabaya Rajapaksa has stoutly denied he was militarising the northern region and insisted troops “are maintaining absolutely essential presence” and were spread across all 22 districts on the island.

He was responding to the charge by Tamil parties and the diaspora that army camps flooded the north even after the government won the war over 30 months ago and no civilian activity — not even family celebrations — could happen without the presence of an army officer.

“We have achieved large-scale development and restoration of normalcy within a short span after ending the 30-year war on terror.

It’s sad some people do not recognise this and instead are talking of sanctions against us. Is this fair and justified?” Mr Gotabaya, the influential brother of President Mahinda Rajapaksa, told India’s Deccan Chronicle in an interview at his high-security office in Colombo.

Rajapaksa also pleaded for a “fair assessment” of the development work and restoration of normal life in the northern region “within a short time of ending the 30-year war against terror” instead of summary branding of the government as rights-abuser.

“In these two-and-a-half years since winning the war, we have made great progress but, unfortunately, some people do not recognise that and harp on unnecessary issues, talk of sanctions (against Colombo).

It was not an ordinary insurgency but real war. You cannot compare the LTTE with any other terrorist outfit, not even Al-Qaeda,” Mr Gotabaya said.

Asked about the fate of senior LTTE leader V. Balakumar (ex-EROS), the defence secretary quipped, “I do not know specific cases. Was he in detention? I do not know. Most of the known characters died in the final battle. Some surrendered. There was ICRC and other agencies during the surrender process.”

Stoutly contesting the charge that the surrendered Tigers were killed in cold blood, Mr Gotabaya said international agencies, including the French MSF (Medicines Sans Frontiers) and the Indian medical team, were present in the battle zone to receive survivors and surrendered militants, the Deccan Chronicle reported.

South Africa responds to LLRC report

The South African Government has noted the release of the final report of the Sri Lankan Commission of Inquiry on Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation (the Commission of Enquiry) and the positive recommendations contained in the report relating to human rights, the return and resettlement of displaced communities, restitution and compensatory relief for the affected people, and post-conflict reconstruction and nation-building.

The report, however, should have addressed in more detail the question of holding those people responsible for human rights violations to account.

The South African Government calls on the Sri Lankan Government to speedily implement the measures as recommended.

The South African Government commends the Sri Lankan Government for the decision to set up an authoritative mechanism to further investigate allegations related to human rights abuses and encourages decisive actions upon the findings.

The solution to the challenges facing the people of Sri Lanka at this critical juncture lies in a genuine and inclusive dialogue among all the people and political parties in Sri Lanka. To this end, South Africa encourages the Government and people of Sri Lanka to create a conducive environment, inside and outside Sri Lanka, that will allow for a meaningful and sustainable political settlement that will lead to a constitution that will be acceptable to all Sri Lankans.

In a spirit of partnership and cooperation, South Africa stands ready to share its experience and work with the people of Sri Lanka as they embark on this journey of building a truly reconciled and united people and nation.

The Commission of Enquiry  was established by President Mahinda Rajapaksa in May 2010,  among other things,  to look into the facts and circumstances which led to the failure of the ceasefire agreement between the Sri Lankan Government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) on 21 February 2002 and the sequence of events that followed thereafter up to the 19th of May 2009 (when the LTTE was defeated in a bloody civil war); whether any person, group or institution directly or indirectly bears the responsibility for alleged human rights abuses especially towards the end of the war;  whether there are any lessons to be learned from those events in order to ensure that there will be no repeat of these events; the methodology whereby restitution to any person affected by those events can be effected; the institutional, administrative and legislative measures to be taken to prevent any recurrence of such concerns in the future;  and to promote national unity and reconciliation among all communities.

UK finds gaps in LLRC report

The British government has noted that there are some gaps in the final report of the Lessons Learned and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC) which was presented to parliament in December.

The British High Commissioner to Sri Lanka John Rankin, in a video posting on the High Commission website, said that the LLRC left a number of questions unanswered.

British Minister Alastair Burt has already made a statement in the British Parliament about the LLRC report, Rankin noted adding that the British government still feels an independent and impartial investigations is required in Sri Lanka.

He said that the report did recognize that there were a significant number of civilian casualties during the war in Sri Lanka.

He also noted that the report mentions that in a number of specific cases further investigations are required.

The high Commission says the real test will now be on implementing the recommendations of the report.